Zika Virus Literature - Latest PubMed Articles

Below is an overview of latest articles and publications on Zika virus in PubMed. PubMed is a service of the US National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals.

View also the Zika Open bulletin of the WHO. This Bulletin is an international journal of public health with a special focus on developing countries. Since it was first published in 1948, it has become one of the world’s leading public health journals. In keeping with its mission statement, the peer-reviewed monthly maintains an open-access policy so that the full contents of the journal and its archives are available online free of charge. As the flagship periodical of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Bulletin draws on WHO experts as editorial advisers, reviewers and authors as well as on external collaborators. Anyone can submit a paper to the Bulletin, and no author charges are levied.


  • Knowledge, attitudes and practices of pregnant women in Martinique in the immediate aftermath of the Zika virus outbreak.
    Knowledge, attitudes and practices of pregnant women in Martinique in the immediate aftermath of the Zika virus outbreak. [Journal Article]Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2018 Jan 11.:70-74.EJDelet J, Cabié A, Merle S, et al. The awareness campaign on zika virus had a significant impact on population's knowledge and main practical information was correctly captured. The information did not spill excessive fear. Nevertheless...The WHO and the HCSP recognize the Zika virus as a public health problem of international concern primarily because of the foetal risks. During the epidemic in Martinique, several modifications to the normal obstetrical follow-up were set up and information had to be delivered to pregnant women about these modifications, the attitudes to prevent infection and the signs motivating additional visits. The objective of our work was to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices of pregnant women in Martinique about the risks associated with Zika infection during pregnancy in the immediate aftermath of the epidemic.A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted from February to May 2017. It took place through an anonymous and standardized face-to-face questionnaire. The questions dealt with the pregnant women general knowledge about the virus, information disseminated by media on this subject, the potential risks, the protective measures taken and the monitoring throughout the pregnancy in case of infection.The total sample consisted of 297 pregnant women. Despite a weak adherence to individual and domestic protection recommendations, we found a good level of knowledge about Zika virus from pregnant women in Martinique. The fetal risk in case of maternal infection was known for 96.6% of those surveyed, individual protective measures were followed by 64.6% of women, 77.0% knew where to go in case of suspected infection, and 79.4% reported that the modifications in follow-up mainly concerned ultrasound monitoring.The awareness campaign on zika virus had a significant impact on population's knowledge and main practical information was correctly captured. The information did not spill excessive fear. Nevertheless, modification of individual behavior appeared harder to obtain.

  • Clinical Assessment and Brain Findings in a Cohort of Mothers, Fetuses and Infants Infected with Zika Virus.
    Clinical Assessment and Brain Findings in a Cohort of Mothers, Fetuses and Infants Infected with Zika Virus. [Journal Article]Am J Obstet Gynecol 2018 Jan 15.AJSanz Cortes M, Rivera AM, Yepez M, et al. Congenital microcephaly is not an optimal screening method for congenital ZIKV syndrome, as it may not accompany other evident and preceding brain findings; microcephaly could be an end-point of the di...Congenital Zika virus (ZIKV) infection can be detected in both the presence and absence of microcephaly, and manifests as a number of signs and symptoms detected clinically and by neuroimaging. However, to date, qualitative and quantitative measures for the purpose of diagnosis and prognosis are limited.Main objectives of this study conducted on fetuses and infants with confirmed congenital ZIKV infection and detected brain abnormalities are: 1) To assess the prevalence of microcephaly and the frequency of the anomalies including a detailed description based on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in fetuses and ultrasound, MRI and computed tomography imaging postnatally; 2) To provide quantitative measures of fetal and infant brain findings by MRI using volumetric analyses and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI); 3) To obtain additional information from placental and fetal histopathological assessments and postnatal clinical evaluations.This is a longitudinal cohort study of ZIKV-infected pregnancies from a single institution in Colombia. Clinical and imaging findings of patients with laboratory confirmed ZIKV infection and fetal brain anomalies were the focus of this study. Patients underwent monthly fetal ultrasound scans, neurosonography and a fetal MRI. Postnatally, infant brain assessment was offered by using ultrasound, MRI and/or computed tomography. Fetal head circumference measurements were compared to different reference ranges using < 2 or 3 standard deviations(SD) below the mean for the diagnosis of microcephaly. Fetal and infant MRI images were processed to obtain a quatitative brain volumetric assessment. DWI sequences were processed to assess brain microstruture. Anthropometric, neurological, auditory and visual assessments were performed postnatally. Histopathological assessment was included if patients opted for pregnancy termination.All subjects (n=214) had been referred for ZIKV symptoms during pregnancy affecting themselves or their partners or if fetal anomalies compatible with congenital ZIKV syndrome were detected. A total of 12 pregnant patients with laboratory confirmation of ZIKV infection were diagnosed with fetal brain malformations. Most common findings assessed by prenatal and postnatal imaging were: brain volume loss (92%), calcifications (92%), callosal anomalies (100%), cortical malformations (89%), and ventriculomegaly (92%). Results from fetal brain volumetric assessment by MRI showed how one of the most common findings associated with microencephaly was reduced supratentorial brain parenchyma and increased subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid. DWI analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values showed microstructural changes. Microcephaly was present in 33.3-58.3% of the cases at referral and present at delivery in 55.6.7-77.8% of cases. At birth, most of the affected neonates (55.6-77.8%) had head circumference measurements more than 3SD below the mean. Postnatal imaging studies confirmed brain malformations detected prenatally. Auditory screening results were normal in 2 cases assessed. Visual screening showed different anomalies 2 of the 3 cases examined. Pathology results obtained from two out of the three cases that opted for termination showed similar signs of abnormalities in central nervous system and placental analyses, including brain microcalcifications.Congenital microcephaly is not an optimal screening method for congenital ZIKV syndrome, as it may not accompany other evident and preceding brain findings; microcephaly could be an end-point of the disease resulting from progressive changes related to brain volume loss. Long-term studies are needed to understand the clinical and developmental relevance of these findings.

  • Low socioeconomic condition and the risk of dengue fever: A direct relationship.
    Low socioeconomic condition and the risk of dengue fever: A direct relationship. [Journal Article]Acta Trop 2018 Jan 15.ATFarinelli EC, Baquero OS, Stephan C, et al. This study aimed to characterize the first dengue fever epidemic in Várzea Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil, and its spatial and spatio-temporal distribution in order to assess the association of socioecono...This study aimed to characterize the first dengue fever epidemic in Várzea Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil, and its spatial and spatio-temporal distribution in order to assess the association of socioeconomic factors with dengue occurrence. We used autochthonous dengue cases confirmed in a 2007 epidemic, the first reported in the city, available in the Information System on Diseases of Compulsory Declaration database. These cases where geocoded by address. We identified spatial and spatio-temporal clusters of high- and low-risk dengue areas using scan statistics. To access the risk of dengue occurrence and to evaluate its relationship with socioeconomic level we used a population-based case-control design. Firstly, we fitted a generalized additive model (GAM) to dengue cases and controls without considering the non-spatial covariates to estimate the odds ratios of the occurrence of the disease. The controls were drawn considering the spatial distribution of the household of the study area and represented the source population of the dengue cases. After that, we assessed the relationship between socioeconomic variables and dengue using the GAM and obtained the effect of these covariates in the occurrence of dengue adjusted by the spatial localization of the cases and controls. Cluster analysis and GAM indicated that northeastern area of Várzea Paulista was the most affected area during the epidemic. The study showed a positive relationship between low socioeconomic condition and increased risk of dengue. We studied the first dengue epidemic in a highly susceptible population at the beginning of the outbreak and therefore it may have allowed to identify an association between low socioeconomic conditions and increased risk of dengue. These results may be useful to predict the occurrence and to identify priority areas to develop control measures for dengue, and also for Zika and Chikungunya; diseases that recently reached Latin America, especially Brazil.

  • Current concerns and perspectives on Zika virus co-infection with arboviruses and HIV.
    Current concerns and perspectives on Zika virus co-infection with arboviruses and HIV. [Journal Article, Review]J Autoimmun 2018 Jan 16.JARothan HA, Bidokhti MRM, Byrareddy SN Dissemination of vector-borne viruses, such as Zika virus (ZIKV), in tropical and sub-tropical regions has a complicated impact on the immunopathogenesis of other endemic viruses such as dengue virus (...Publisher Full TextDissemination of vector-borne viruses, such as Zika virus (ZIKV), in tropical and sub-tropical regions has a complicated impact on the immunopathogenesis of other endemic viruses such as dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The consequences of the possible co-infections with these viruses have specifically shown significant impact on the treatment and vaccination strategies. ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus from African and Asian lineages that causes neurological complications in infected humans. Many of DENV and CHIKV endemic regions have been experiencing outbreaks of ZIKV infection. Intriguingly, the mosquitoes, Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus, can simultaneously transmit all the combinations of ZIKV, DENV, and CHIKV to the humans. The co-circulation of these viruses leads to a complicated immune response due to the pre-existence or co-existence of ZIKV infection with DENV and CHIKV infections. The non-vector transmission of ZIKV, especially, via sexual intercourse and placenta represents an additional burden that may hander the treatment strategies of other sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV. Collectively, ZIKV co-circulation and co-infection with other viruses have inevitable impact on the host immune response, diagnosis techniques, and vaccine development strategies for the control of these co-infections.

  • Blocking Zika virus vertical transmission.
    Blocking Zika virus vertical transmission. [Journal Article]Sci Rep 2018 Jan 19; 8(1):1218.SRMesci P, Macia A, Moore SM, et al. The outbreak of the Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with increased incidence of congenital malformations. Although recent efforts have focused on vaccine development, treatments for infected indi...Publisher Full TextThe outbreak of the Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with increased incidence of congenital malformations. Although recent efforts have focused on vaccine development, treatments for infected individuals are needed urgently. Sofosbuvir (SOF), an FDA-approved nucleotide analog inhibitor of the Hepatitis C (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) was recently shown to be protective against ZIKV both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that SOF protected human neural progenitor cells (NPC) and 3D neurospheres from ZIKV infection-mediated cell death and importantly restored the antiviral immune response in NPCs. In vivo, SOF treatment post-infection (p.i.) decreased viral burden in an immunodeficient mouse model. Finally, we show for the first time that acute SOF treatment of pregnant dams p.i. was well-tolerated and prevented vertical transmission of the virus to the fetus. Taken together, our data confirmed SOF-mediated sparing of human neural cell types from ZIKV-mediated cell death in vitro and reduced viral burden in vivo in animal models of chronic infection and vertical transmission, strengthening the growing body of evidence for SOF anti-ZIKV activity.

  • Auditory brainstem function in microcephaly related to Zika virus infection.
    Auditory brainstem function in microcephaly related to Zika virus infection. [Journal Article]Neurology 2018 Jan 19.NeurMarques Abramov D, Saad T, Gomes-Junior SC, et al. These results are consistent with the functional normality of the brainstem structure and its lack of correlation with microcephaly, suggesting that the disruption produced by the ZV infection does not...Publisher Full TextTo study the effect of prenatal Zika virus (ZV) infection on brainstem function reflected in brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs).In a cross-sectional study in 19 children (12 girls) with microcephaly related to ZV infection, aged between 12 and 62 weeks, the brainstem function was examined through BAEPs. The latencies of wave peaks I, III, and V of the left and right ears (n = 37) were standardized according to normative data, and compared between them by 2-tailed t test. The confounding variables (cephalic perimeter at the born and chronological age) were correlated with the normalized latencies using Pearson test.All patients showed, in general, clear waveforms, with latencies within 3 SDs of the normative values. However, statistically increased latencies of waves I and III (I > III, p = 0.031) were observed, relative to wave V (p < 0.001), the latter being closer to respective normative value. The latency of wave I was observed to increase with age (r = 0.45, p = 0.005). The waves, in turn, did not depend on cephalic perimeter.These results are consistent with the functional normality of the brainstem structure and its lack of correlation with microcephaly, suggesting that the disruption produced by the ZV infection does not act in the cell proliferation phase, but mostly in the processes of neuronal migration and differentiation in the telencephalon.

  • Ross River virus in Australian blood donors: possible implications for blood transfusion safety.
    Ross River virus in Australian blood donors: possible implications for blood transfusion safety. [Journal Article]Transfusion 2018 Jan 19.TFaddy HM, Tran TV, Hoad VC, et al. Our results suggest that the yearly risk of collecting a RRV-infected blood donation in Australia is low and is at the lower range of previous risk modeling. The majority of Australian donor centers we...Publisher Full TextEmerging transfusion-transmissible pathogens, including arboviruses such as West Nile, Zika, dengue, and Ross River viruses, are potential threats to transfusion safety. The most prevalent arbovirus in humans in Australia is Ross River virus (RRV); however, prevalence varies substantially around the country. Modeling estimated a yearly risk of 8 to 11 potentially RRV-viremic fresh blood components nationwide. This study aimed to measure the occurrence of RRV viremia among donors who donated at Australian collection centers located in areas with significant RRV transmission during one peak season.Plasma samples were collected from donors (n = 7500) who donated at the selected collection centers during one peak season. Viral RNA was extracted from individual samples, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed.Regions with the highest rates of RRV transmission were not areas where donor centers were located. We did not detect RRV RNA among 7500 donations collected at the selected centers, resulting in a zero risk estimate with a one-sided 95% confidence interval of 0 to 1 in 2019 donations.Our results suggest that the yearly risk of collecting a RRV-infected blood donation in Australia is low and is at the lower range of previous risk modeling. The majority of Australian donor centers were not in areas known to be at the highest risk for RRV transmission, which was not taken into account in previous models based on notification data. Therefore, we believe that the risk of RRV transfusion transmission in Australia is acceptably low and appropriately managed through existing risk management, including donation restrictions and recall policies.

  • Evolution of Knowledge, Awareness, and Practices regarding Zika Virus from 2016 to 2017.
    Evolution of Knowledge, Awareness, and Practices regarding Zika Virus from 2016 to 2017. [Journal Article]Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol 2017.:6350602.IDKatler Q, Godiwala P, Macri C, et al. Our results provide novel insight into the transformation of knowledge, attitudes, and practice of community members and healthcare providers regarding Zika virus since its declaration as a public heal...PMC Free Full TextPublisher Full TextOur team created a knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP) survey in order to assess changes over time in healthcare provider and community member awareness of Zika virus symptoms, transmission, treatment, and current and future concerns.The cross-sectional survey was issued at an academic medical center in Washington, DC, and via an online link to healthcare providers and community members between June and August 2016. Survey distribution was then repeated the following year, from March to April 2017. Outcomes were compared by survey year and healthcare provider versus community member status using SAS Program Version 9.4.Significant differences in knowledge, attitudes, and practices existed between 2016 and 2017 survey time points. By 2017, more respondents had knowledge of various Zika virus infection characteristics; however healthcare provider knowledge also waned in certain areas. Attitudes towards Zika virus infection displayed an overall decreased concern by 2017. Practice trends by 2017 demonstrated fewer travel restrictions to Zika-endemic areas and increased mosquito protective measures within the US.Our results provide novel insight into the transformation of knowledge, attitudes, and practice of community members and healthcare providers regarding Zika virus since its declaration as a public health emergency of international concern in 2016.

  • Persistence of Zika Virus After Birth: Clinical, Virological, Neuroimaging, and Neuropathological Documentation in a 5-Month Infant With Congenital Zika Syndrome.
    Persistence of Zika Virus After Birth: Clinical, Virological, Neuroimaging, and Neuropathological Documentation in a 5-Month Infant With Congenital Zika Syndrome. [Journal Article]J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 2018 Jan 13.JNChimelli L, Moura Pone S, Avvad-Portari E, et al. During the Zika epidemic in Brazil, a baby was born at term with microcephaly and arthrogryposis. The mother had Zika symptoms at 10 weeks of gestation. At 17 weeks, ultrasound showed cerebral malforma...Publisher Full TextDuring the Zika epidemic in Brazil, a baby was born at term with microcephaly and arthrogryposis. The mother had Zika symptoms at 10 weeks of gestation. At 17 weeks, ultrasound showed cerebral malformation and ventriculomegaly. At 24 weeks, the amniotic fluid contained ZIKV RNA and at birth, placenta and maternal blood were also positive using RT-qPCR. At birth the baby urine contained ZIKV RNA, whereas CSF at birth and urine at 17 days did not. Seizures started at 6 days. EEG was abnormal and CT scan showed cerebral atrophy, calcifications, lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, and cerebellar hypoplasia. Bacterial sepsis at 2 months was treated. A sudden increase in head circumference occurred at 4 months necessitating ventricle-peritoneal shunt placement. At 5 months, the infant died with sepsis due to bacterial meningitis. Neuropathological findings were as severe as some of those found in neonates who died soon after birth, including hydrocephalus, destructive lesions/calcification, gliosis, abnormal neuronal migration, dysmaturation of nerve cells, hypomyelination, loss of descending axons, and spinal motor neurons. ZIKV RNA was detected only in frozen brain tissue using RT-qPCR, but infected cells were not detected by in situ hybridization. Progressive gliosis and microgliosis in the midbrain may have contributed to aqueduct compression and subsequent hydrocephalus. The etiology of progressive disease after in utero infection is not clear and requires investigation.

  • Inferring the risk factors behind the geographical spread and transmission of Zika in the Americas.
    Inferring the risk factors behind the geographical spread and transmission of Zika in the Americas. [Journal Article]PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018 Jan 18; 12(1):e0006194.PNGardner LM, Bóta A, Gangavarapu K, et al. Our model generates country level exportation and importation risk profiles over the course of the epidemic and provides quantitative estimates for the likelihood of introduced Zika virus resulting in ...Publisher Full TextAn unprecedented Zika virus epidemic occurred in the Americas during 2015-2016. The size of the epidemic in conjunction with newly recognized health risks associated with the virus attracted significant attention across the research community. Our study complements several recent studies which have mapped epidemiological elements of Zika, by introducing a newly proposed methodology to simultaneously estimate the contribution of various risk factors for geographic spread resulting in local transmission and to compute the risk of spread (or re-introductions) between each pair of regions. The focus of our analysis is on the Americas, where the set of regions includes all countries, overseas territories, and the states of the US.We present a novel application of the Generalized Inverse Infection Model (GIIM). The GIIM model uses real observations from the outbreak and seeks to estimate the risk factors driving transmission. The observations are derived from the dates of reported local transmission of Zika virus in each region, the network structure is defined by the passenger air travel movements between all pairs of regions, and the risk factors considered include regional socioeconomic factors, vector habitat suitability, travel volumes, and epidemiological data. The GIIM relies on a multi-agent based optimization method to estimate the parameters, and utilizes a data driven stochastic-dynamic epidemic model for evaluation. As expected, we found that mosquito abundance, incidence rate at the origin region, and human population density are risk factors for Zika virus transmission and spread. Surprisingly, air passenger volume was less impactful, and the most significant factor was (a negative relationship with) the regional gross domestic product (GDP) per capita.Our model generates country level exportation and importation risk profiles over the course of the epidemic and provides quantitative estimates for the likelihood of introduced Zika virus resulting in local transmission, between all origin-destination travel pairs in the Americas. Our findings indicate that local vector control, rather than travel restrictions, will be more effective at reducing the risks of Zika virus transmission and establishment. Moreover, the inverse relationship between Zika virus transmission and GDP suggests that Zika cases are more likely to occur in regions where people cannot afford to protect themselves from mosquitoes. The modeling framework is not specific for Zika virus, and could easily be employed for other vector-borne pathogens with sufficient epidemiological and entomological data.